Clue App for Tracking Periods

Clue app helps parents talk to girls about their first period

In Apps by Angela AmmanLeave a Comment

Health apps for teens make hard conversations easier

Talking to your preteen or teen daughter about her first period doesn’t have to be an awkward conversation. The Clue app offers a way for girls to track the physical and emotional changes involved with tracking their monthly cycles. Learn tips about talking to your daughter about her first period and check out the ways the health app for teens can make the transition easier for girls.

health app for teens

The Clue app helps you and your teen understand your monthly cycles

Designed to be informative and user-friendly, the Clue app announces immediately: Confident. Scientific. Not pink. We don’t have a problem with pink around here, but the idea that Clue is based on science and data will help moms and daughters talk about their monthly cycles in a way that helps everyone. Your menstrual cycle is about so much more than your actual period, and tracking your physical state and emotions throughout the month can help your teen make sense of the fluctuations happening throughout the month.

health app for teens

Increased app use makes Clue more accurate — and more helpful

Clue reminds women, “Get to know your body. It’s not a clock.” The more you use the Clue app, the more accurately the app can make predictions about your next cycle. This increased accuracy is helpful for teens who are just learning about the way their bodies feel during different parts of their menstrual cycle. Women will find Clue to be an amazing app for tracking fertility, as well as their monthly cycle. Accurate tracking helps Clue predict your window of fertility each month, which is crucial when you’re trying to get pregnant.

How to talk to your teen or preteen about her first period

Ida Tin, the Founder and CEO of the Clue app, has helpful, practical information to help moms talk to their daughters about their first periods. Her advice can be helpful even if you’re talking to a family friend or a niece.

  • Leave euphemisms out of it. There’s no need to be vague or mysterious about periods. Half the world’s population experiences a menstrual cycle at some point, after all. Talk plainly to your kids about what’s happening – or if you’re not comfortable, give them some accurate but accessible reading material (like the info in Clue!)
  • Share your experience. Do you remember your first period? Whether your story was casual or embarrassing, funny or mundane, it can be helpful to your daughter to know that you went through the same things that she’s experiencing.
  • Atypical is typical. Menstrual cycles for teens can range from 21-45 days — and that’s totally normal in early menstruators, because the hormonal system/circuitry that regulates their cycles is still maturing. For most women it takes about six years for their cycle to settle into a personal “normal.”
  • Play and pamper. From period underwear to mail-order period care packages, there’s tons of ways to make your teen feel special and celebrated leading up to and during her first cycle.
Have you had to have the period talk with a daughter, niece or family friend? How did it go?

Meet the Author | Angela Amman

Angela Amman is a short story and essay writer. Collecting her family's stories is a gift-in-progress for her daughter and son, and she blogs at Playing with Words, capturing the craziness and beauty that weave together to create something extraordinary. As the co-director of Listen To Your Mother Metro Detroit, Angela is thrilled to bring others' stories to the stage and to celebrate the magic of words, storytelling, and the courage to share that magic with an audience. When she should be sleeping, she works on her latest short story collection. Her writing has been featured on Mamalode, Peacock Journal, and Scary Mommy. Her personal essays and short stories have appeared in her collection, Nothing Goes Away, and various anthologies.

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